• Model name: SGI O2
  • Manufacturer: Silicon Graphics
  • Released: 1996
  • Operating system: IRIX (UNIX variant)
  • CPU: RISC R500oPC 180 MHz - R12o0oSC 400 MHz
  • RAM: Expandable to 1 GB RAM (my own: 192 MB)
  • Video resolution: 1280×1024
  • Sound: Iris Audio processor
  • I/O ports: Ethernet, VGA, PS/2 mouse and keyboard, many proprietary SGI cards

Released 1996: The O2 was an entry-level Unix workstation by Silicon Graphics, Inc. (SGI) to replace their earlier Indy series. Like the Indy, the O2 used a single MIPS microprocessor and was intended to be used mainly for multimedia. Its larger counterpart was the SGI Octane. The O2 was SGI’s last attempt at a low-end workstation.

My SGI O2: An friend gave this to me for free. It misses the original SGI keyboard, mouse and monitor, but it uses normal PS/2 connections, and I’ve found a keyboard and mouse for it. Not all modern monitors will work, but my vintage DELL 2001FP from 2004 works perfectly with  everything, also this one.

Owning my own SGI workstation would be like a wet dream in the mid 90’s, where I did a lot of 3D modelling and raytracing on my Amiga 4000 computer. My friend has also installed 192 MB RAM and an extra 2 GB Ultra II SCSI HD, I think. He told med it was really hard and tricky to install the IRIX operating system on it (UNIX variant), but he managed it after some struggling. I’ve got my hands of a demo version of Realsoft 3D for the SGI, but haven’t tried it out yet. My favorite 3D raytracing program on the Amiga platform was Real 3D, and I used it a lot for modelling, animation and raytracing. The later versions of Real 3D after Amiga support was abandoned, was renamed Realsoft 3D and made for several different platform, also for the SGI workstations.


Remi Jakobsen

I'm collecting classic computers and video games, stretching from the 70's into the 90's. Restoration, history, usage ...

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